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Rhino3d for Mac Tutorial Series - Curated by Simply Rhino to help you get started and learn Rhino on the Mac platform.

This is the video transcript, published alongside the video, to further support your Rhino learning experience.

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Rhino for Mac Video Tutorial 2 Screenshot

 

Welcome to the Simply Rhino, Rhino for Mac Tutorial series. I’m Sean from Simply Rhino and in this tutorial I’ll be covering polyline, line segments, line and two freeform code commands, firstly control point curve and then interpret curve.

So let’s start by just looking at the line command. We can access the line command by placing my cursor over the polyline button here, holding down my cursor and sliding across here to line and release. Now in bold, it’s asking me here for the start of the line. My cursor has changed to a small pair of crosshairs which means that I can make a left click, or I can type in a coordinate or a distance in this line here. So I make a left click. Now I’m going to make another left click to define the end of the line. Now in order to repeat that command, I right click on the mouse and I slide along here to repeat line line and I make another left click. Now I’m just repeating this action to show you the both sides option. So I clicked on both sides there and you can see now that my line is being created, equidistant from the very first line that I chose. So by clicking on Ortho here, I am going to constrain my line to the horizontal and I make a left click. Now just drag a window across those and backspace to delete them.

Now, let’s have a look at polyline. Now if I click on this button here, polyline, start of polyline here in bold. So I make a series of left clicks. Now I’m constrained to 90 degree angles, so if I turn Ortho off I have now complete freedom. If I bring my cursor back to the very start of the line, I can find the very start by finding the objects that I can point. So that’s a polyline and if I select that, that will be selected as a single object because the point at which we have kinks, a kink is a sharp change in direction, the curves are joined.

Now let’s look at a line segment command. If I hold my cursor over polyline here, you’ll see that line segments is listed after polyline, so that means that I can make a right click in order to use the lines command, line segments. So I make a series of left clicks, very similar to the previous one. Again, we can close it with the left click. Now look, if I make a single left click on these objects, it’s going to identify them as single open curves. In order to flip between the two different states, I can select my polyline here and I can use my explode icon here to turn that into a series of segments, and just to do the same here, if I window select these objects here. Now I’m going to join them. So it’s as if this one now was drawn with a polyline and this one with line segments. We’ll see later how some commands require line segments, some require open curves. Now I’m just going to window space those, backspace and delete.

Now let’s have a look at some free form curves. We’ll be just having a look at two commands. If I make a left click over here, that’ll be a control point curve. You can see now over the top left hand corner, it’s looking for start of curve and there’s my crosshairs. Now if I make a series of left clicks on the construction plane, and you can see that the points that I pick don’t pass through them but it’s influenced by them. I press enter to close that.

Now let’s have a look at an interpret point curve. Now let’s find that on the list here. If I hold down my button I can come down to the third one and choose interpret points. I make a series of left clicks, now you can see how this differs. The curve that I’m creating is driven by the points that I pick, and of course we’ve got the undo here that’ll cycle us back through those points and to close that I just press enter on the keyboard.

Now let’s have a look at the control points of these two objects. Now I’m going to come across to here. Here’s my points on button and there’s my control points. So you can see now that I can window select some of these control points, and if I just drag them with the wheel of my mouse, we can see that that’s going to alter the shape of my curve and I’m just going to press escape twice to turn those control points off.

Thank you for joining us for this tutorial. I hope that was helpful. Please subscribe to our Simply Rhino, Rhino for Mac YouTube channel in order to receive notifications of new tutorials as they are added. Thank you. Good bye.

Rhino3d Video Tutorials Transcripts - To further support you as you learn and progress with Rhino we've transcribed each of our video tutorials.

In this video we're looking at creating and controlling transition surfaces in Rhino.

Return to Transition Surfaces – Managing Shape and Continuity Video
 


Rhino3d Transition Surfaces Video Screenshot

Hi, this is Phil from Simply Rhino and in this video we’re going to take a look at creating and controlling transitional surfaces.

The transitional surface in this example is this blended section between the body side and the outer edge of the wheel arch. When we create a surface like this we are generally interested in not only controlling the shape of this surface, and this shape may change as the cross section moves from end to end of the wheel arch but we’re also looking at controlling the matching at either side of the new surface, so that we can produce an end result where we have a seamless match and a shape that we are fully in control of.

Before we look at ways of creating the transitional surface let’s first take a look at the ways in which continuity is both expressed and evaluated inside of Rhino. The simplest type of continuity is G0 (Zero) or Positional Continuity. This simply states that the edges of our new surface highlighted here will be within the absolute modelling tolerance of the edges of the existing surfaces so that we should be able to join these into a watertight condition. If we want to check for a watertight join we can first join the surfaces together, highlight them, go to our analysis tools, edge tools and show edges. If we only select naked edges and choose a nice bright colour for example yellow here, then the absence of any yellow along our edges here shows us that they are joined within a watertight condition. If we have a look at this surface with an environment map we’ll see that beyond the joined edges there’s no further geometric continuity so we see a very noticeable edge here. Where we want to check for conditions like this where we only have positional continuity we can use the Zebra tools: Analyse / Surface / Zebra. Where the Zebra stripes don’t run into each other, like this, then this shows us that we have at best a G0 (Zero) positional continuity.

The next step up from Positional G0 (Zero) is G1 Tangent Continuity. This starts with the premise that the G0 condition is met and adds to this the fact that the tangent direction of the adjacent surface edges is the same. This has the effect in this case of changing the shape of our transitional surface and you can see that we have a much smoother transition between the body side and the outside edge of the wheel arch. We can check for tangent continuity by using the Zebra tools and where the Zebras actually run into each other this is indicative of tangent continuity. However you’ll notice that across the curve edges there is a sharp noticeable kink or change in direction of Zebras and this again is indicative of Tangent Continuity.

The next step up from G1 Tangent Continuity is G2 Curvature Continuity this starts with the premise that the G1 Tangent Continuity is already met and adds to this the fact that as well as the tangent direction of the adjacent surface edges being the same then the radius of curvature at the edge of the surfaces is also the same. So we have a smoother transition over the surface edges. When we look at this with the Zebra tools we’ll see a subtle change in the Zebras. What we’ll see is that the Zebras still run into each other but we’ve now lost that sharp kink over the surface edges. We’ll still see that there’s quite a quick change in direction here by the shape of the Zebras but you can see that this is now much smoother.

When we look at this in terms of the reflective qualities, for example if I add an environment map to this again we’ll see a much smoother result. Sometimes the difference is quite subtle between a curvature continuous match and a tangent match, but we should be able to compare these two and see a slight difference. So if I go back to the tangent match you can see here that as I play across this surface we can see little areas where we’ve got quite a noticeable change in surface direction there.  So the tangent direction is matched but the curvature is different and this represents itself as this slightly harsher highlight. If we look at the same position here and look at this harsh highlight down here with a curvature match you’ll see this is much softer so as we play across this edge that transition is much softer and if we were to use a slightly different reflection here such as a fluorescent tube for example then we’d see a bigger difference. Here across the edges is where you can see the bigger difference with a tangent match so what we actually see on the zebras is something akin to the reflections. Now this reflection map that we’re using here, the fluorescent tube, is a very good tool to use to actually check the shape of the blend as we create this.

So now we’ve looked at actually what these basic geometric continuities are then let’s take a look at how we can create surfaces in Rhino whilst matching the tangent. Let’s take a look at how we can create these surfaces in Rhino, control the shape and match the edge conditions at the same time.

A relatively simple way of creating a transition surface between these two existing surfaces is to use the Blend Surface tool. From the Surface menu we go to Blend Surface, I have got some Command line options here, which I’m going to leave at Default, then I’m going to pick the two edges in question. Then I’m going to Enter, or right click, and I’ll get into the preview mode for the tool. So the Blend Surface tool is an interactive tool, it’s slider based so I can move these sliders to change the end bulge and therefore the shape of the blended surface and I can also set a different continuity on for example edge 1 than I have on edge 2. Now this tool also gives me the ability to use edge matching beyond the G2 curvature matching that we looked at earlier on in the video. So for example if I set edge 1 to G3 or flow continuity you’ll see that we get another control point here and the analogy here is that if you consider the G2 blend on this side being analogist to a degree 3 surface so that there is a curvature continuous transition across this edge then the G3 match on this side is analogist to a degree 4 surface so there is a constant rate of change of curvature going into the blend and then a G4 match will have a constant rate of change of the rate of change of curvature so it’s analogist to a degree 5 surface. Now the position, tangency and curvature matches can be considered absolute and are measurable. The G3 and G4 matches can be considered as being aesthetic improvements over the G2 curvature match so there is not a way in which we can analyse these and say there is definitely a G3 or G4 condition. So the best way to look at these is with the environment map tools. If we go back to looking at the slider based tools we can lock both of the sliders together here and control the end bulge of both edges at the same time. With surfaces like this we’re probably looking to have less of a S shape that we would have at the default position of 1 and maybe more of a taughter surface here. Now when we do this using the slider tools alone what will happen is that we’ll get most of the shape right across the majority of the blend but where we have more local shape change going on at the ends we might actually compromise the shape at the ends by merely using the sliders. So we can also use these handles that we get here and these allow us to adjust the shape locally by moving the control points on the handles. Now these handles are set up so we can move these points without changing the inherent continuity across here and we can also should we wish add more handles along the blend so we can add more local shape change. Now you might want to avoid adding too many of these because the blend shape might become more complex but in this case for example then it would be a fairly obvious place to add another handle might be at the top of the blend here. So we do this by adding shapes, make sure here that we’ve got the perpendicular snap on, maybe snap to a mid snap on one edge and find a perpendicular point on another edge and snap to that and this gives us the ability to add a handle. We can then for example say that against edge 1 you might want to step up the continuity and then we can start to play a little with the shape change here. So maybe I’ll just slightly raise this shape up a little here and certainly up here maybe give this blend a little more room to work in so I’ll just give this a bit more shape here. Now you may need to do this iteratively by closing the blend tool and then looking at the result with the environment map. One of the things you’ll see with this shape is that when you step up the continuity here from G2 to G3 is that it just means that the shape transitions a little better into the side of the wheel arch. Typically things to look out for here is that we get a constant or a fairly good progression of this highlight as we move down the wheel arch here, we kind of want to see the same thing going on in the back. Now we can see here we have a little bit of trouble going on here where the surface maybe got a little bit of a ripple in it here. One of the reasons for this is that we’ve got a shorter gap here in which to create the bend than here and at the top of the bend so this is an area that needs work here. Now we would go on and do more with the blend surface tool but another way that we can do this and possibly a preferred way might be to use the two rail sweep tool.

The two rail sweep tool will give us a nice taut surface that generally is free from local inflections. Now if we use the two surface edges as our rails then we first of all need to put in some cross sections and a very useful tool in creating these cross sections is the adjustable curve blend tool. This is found on the curve tools here and it’s ‘Adjustable Curve Blend’. For these edges here we can just click up on the surface edges and build the appropriate surface blend. Like the blend surface tool this tool has the ability to match up to G4 and I’m going to pick a G3 match here on the curve that goes into the wheel arch outer and G2 curvature to match to the body side. Again I can adjust these handles whilst the tool is live without fear of losing the continuity. So I can add another blend here, swap the edges around here, and this is kind of where I want to just add a little more shape to this blend, it was a little bit too flat before which is why we were getting the ripple in the surface at the end. Gradually nudge this curve round, take a look at that. If we want to add additional cross sections in the centre here we can do this fairly easily now it may be helpful here to draw a straight line first of all and take this straight line from for example a mid point to a perpendicular point. Next up we can use the adjustable curve blend tool again but this time we can use the edge option and we can pick anywhere on these edges and then slide the blend into position by snapping to the end of the straight line and then I can go into the appropriate blend here and start to adjust the shape of the blend. So with this we want to keep the shape of this blend quite flat at the top here. Ok once I’ve got my cross sections set up I can then run the Sweep 2 Rails tool – pick the two rails and then pick the cross sections. I can match the edges for curvature here, just because we have the 3 curves already set up to match for curvature doesn’t actually ensure that our edges will match for curvature here so adding this will help to ensure my edges match correctly. There’s a maintain height option here on the sweep like there is with a lot of the tools here but you can see that in this case it’s making a small difference but let’s have a look at what it’s doing down here, yes it’s making a very small difference here so I’ll leave that off for the moment and let’s just have a look at how that looks. Again we’ve got not a bad progression of the highlight here, let’s have a look at what happens on the back, again the back now is slightly better you can see how this shape now progresses better and I think we’ve lost the crease here. You can see that as we go up the wheel arch here the shape gets tighter here and then it gradually smooth’s out here so we get more definition if you like in this corner here at the top of the wheel arch and then we lose that definition as we go down the edges and this is a way of removing that kink in the surface. So again this may be something of an iterative process in using two rail sweep but it’s a very controllable process and it will give us a very taut surface that is free from local inflections. It’s always helpful to look at this in a rendered mode as well with a reflective material, I’m going to match the material of my blend and it’s helpful as well to add context to this because then the shape and the form that you are looking at when you see this in context it all makes a lot more sense. So use any of the surface analysis tools here until you are happy with the result. The idea with these tools of course is that we want to create a surface which is not too over complex.

Another potential solution is to use Network Surface. Network Surface is generally better suited for surfaces where we have a lot of local shape change and undulation and is less well suited to the type of surface we’re trying to create here. If I use exactly the same set of curves that we used for the sweep two rail example let’s see what we can do with network surface. So it’s Surface and Curve Network and we pick the four boundary curves and the one interior curve and enter. Now Network Surfaces allows you where possible to match to all the boundary edges but of course we’ve only got two surfaces here, D and B, to which we can match curvature continuous. If we preview the surface you can see that unlike the sweep this produces a very complex surface because this fits the edge curves to a tolerance and although we can slacken off the interior curves here we still end up with a very complex surface and you’ll see that if I add another decimal place here and preview that my surface becomes even more dense. So I run the risk of not being able to join these edges together yet still have a complex surface, part of the problem of course of having this complex surface is that we’ll get undulations across this surface. We can see this is if we go into our environment map and we choose our fluorescent tube result, you can see here that with exactly the same set of curves that we used to create a quite smooth swept result that here we have particularly around this area here we have a really nasty looking surface. On an average it’s not bad around the top here but when we look closely at this you can see we’ve got some issues around here. So the fact that Network Surface produces this dense topology that isn’t necessarily that well related to the overall shape means that it’s a great surface for things like terrain and objects where we have a lot of local shape change but it’s not a good surface solution for something like this where we want to have a simple taut surface that produces a very clean result.

Another way of looking at this and particularly if you wanted a single span surface as a result of creating the transition surface is to make sure that both of the edges that we’re working against here are untrimmed edges and that this cross section and this cross section have the same number of control points. So here we’ve got an adjustable curve blend that is matched for curvature continuity at each end and we’ve got surface edges that are both untrimmed. These surfaces are both degree 5 as well with the minimum number of control points. So to build a single span surface across here we can use 2 Rail Sweep and we can build this and then turn on the simple sweep. The simple sweep will, if the geometry permits, allow us to build a surface that has the same number of control points as the rails and the cross section. In this case it will produce a surface that’s degree 5 with 6 control points in both directions. However when we use simple sweep you’ll disable the matching options, so for example here when you look at this with an environment map on we’ll see that we’ve lost the matching here. The matching though is something we can recover using the surface tools, so we can go to Surface Edit Tools and Match and we can hit the Multiple Match option and we can choose the surface to change, which is the wheel arch surface that we’ve just created and the surface to match to, which is the body side, and then Enter. Then we can select the next surface to change and the next surface to match to and enter and then when we’re done with the edges we can enter again to get into preview mode, we can choose curvature continuity and as long as we don’t have refine match turned on here we won’t add any control points when we create the matching. Now because our surface edges were already close enough to each other we should be able to actually join the result of this into a watertight condition and we should also have a solution that looks pretty smooth. Now it should be said that it’s quite difficult to produce both of these surfaces as single span surfaces to start off with, so this would only be the sort of thing you would do if you were entirely certain that you needed a surface with a minimum number of control points here for the wheel arch component.

So from the solutions we’ve looked at perhaps the blend surface solution and the Sweep 2 Rails solution are the most appropriate solutions on this case. The single span solution probably requires too much effort to produce a surface that is anywhere near as good as the sweep 2 rail example we have here and the network surface solution simply doesn’t produce a surface with the desired continuity. So this as I’ve said is the Sweep 2 Rail solution that we looked at earlier on, it’s a fairly quick and reliable method of creating a smooth transitional surface.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this video and please look out for further tutorials in this series.

 

Rhino3d Video Tutorials Transcripts - To further support you as you learn and progress with Rhino we've transcribed each of our video tutorials. 

In this video we look at Rhino Block Instances and V-Ray Proxies.

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Rhino Block Instances & V-Ray Proxies
 

Hi this is Phil Cook from Simply Rhino and in this tutorial video we are going to look at Rhino Block Instances and V-Ray Proxies.

Proxies and Block Instances are extremely useful when we have multiple instances of the same object within a file. They are also very useful when we have large files. In the model that we are going to look at in this video, we have a simple deodorant dispenser of which we have a couple of variants, and these are housed inside a moulded merchandising tray.

So here’s the model inside of Rhino and in this model we’ve just got one instance of the deodorant pack housed in the appropriate position in the tray and you can see that we’ve got a V-Ray RT image going on here and the deodorant pack itself has six individual V-Ray materials.

So first of all by way of a comparison of things we’re going to do later on, I’m going to take the model of the deodorant pack and I’m just going to produce an array of this inside of Rhino and immediately inside of Rhino, you can see that the display slows up a little. Nothing too dramatic because we’ve got quite a decent graphics card in this machine, but you can see that the display isn’t quite as wieldy as it was previously and when we come to render, obviously we’re faced with more polygons and V-Ray or any renderer is going to take a longer time to render the additional polygons. Perhaps the biggest issue though is that when we come to save the file, then our file size is going to increase dramatically. So if I just save this file just to test out this theory, you will see that our file size is going to increase from 9MB to 197MB. So every one of those deodorant packs is contributing its full weight of geometry to the file.

So clearly we need a better way of managing these multiple components, and the first way that we can look at is to use Rhino Block Instances. So first of all there is nothing really special about the component file that we need to use for a Rhino Block Instance, all we need to have is a standard Rhino model, and here we have a model of the deodorant pack with individual elements on their own individual layers and we have V-Ray materials already applied to our object. Depending on how you insert the block instance in to the Rhino assembly model, the position of the model relative to the origin, to 000 in the component Block Instance file, could be important and here you’ll notice that the centre of the base of our deodorant pack is centred around 000. So this is the component that we are going to use to Block. We don’t need to do anything special to this other than save this as a Rhino file.

And now I’m going to open a model of the tray, and this model has the tray with V-Ray material applied to it and we have a dome light and a floor set up in here. So in other words, we have a scene already set up for rendering. So to bring in our deodorant pack as a Block Instance, we go to file and insert and we point to the file. I’m going to choose the black version of the deodorant pack and I’m going to insert as a Block Instance rather than a group or individual objects. At the insertion point dialogue I’m going to choose prompt, and for scale I’m going to choose uniform scale of one, i.e. I don’t want to change the size of the component and I’m going to uncheck the rotation prompt. Click okay and we then get taken to a second scheme and this is where some important things are decided about how we bring in the Block and we have three important choices here. First of all we can choose to embed the geometry. If we do this, there is very little difference between just importing Rhino geometry. We can then choose to embed and link the geometry. This brings in the full weight of one of the instances of the geometry and maintains the link to the component file. So if we were to at a later date, update the deodorant pack, then we would have an option to update to the latest pack inside of our assembly model. And finally we have link. Link is perhaps the most useful and interesting option here, because this just maintains a link to the deodorant pack and doesn’t really bring in any geometry at all, it just brings in a reference. So it’s great for keeping file sizes small. We can also choose up here to read linked Blocks from this file, this means that if our component that we’re bringing in itself has references to other components, then those links will be maintained, and lastly we can choose a layer style here, either active or reference. I’m going to choose active in this instance, and then I can hit okay and the Block will be brought in.

You will see that the cursor, where the Block is located is actually snapped to the origin position on the component file and this gives me a useful way of being able to reference a position that I can snap to. So it makes it easy for me to be able to drop the component into the correct position. You’ll see that the layer names are maintained. So all the individual layers that were in the component file, come in to the assembly model, and if I go to my V-Ray materials, you’ll see that all my materials component are brought in to my model.

Now if I actually want to have more than one Block Instance, I don’t need to go back to the insert dialogue to bring in more Block Instances. I can merely treat this block as if it were Rhino geometry and I can then do my rectangular array. Okay and essentially the blocks behave from the point of view of visualisation and the point of view of seeing the geometry in our model, they behave just like Rhino geometry.

So you can see in the V-Ray RT render now that all the materials that were on the original object have come in with the Block Instance and then as we’ve arrayed that Block Instance around then we’ve got multiple instances of the same object. Now the biggest benefit of blocks in terms of Rhino is really in terms of the file size. Here if we were to save this file, and we’ll overwrite one of the ones that we wrote earlier on, you’ll see that our file size goes from 6MB and really there is just a slight change here, 7.6MB. So by using blocks we have substantially reduced the file size.

The other nice thing about blocks is that we can replace one component with another component. This of course with the caveat that they are referenced about the same position. So for example, if I now wanted to do a visual of the merchandising pack with a slightly different variant of the bottle in it, I can go to my edit menu and blocks, and look at my blocks manager and see here I’ve got my super cool black reference here. This is actually telling me which file is being brought in as a Block Instance and I can go to properties here and I can change the reference for the file. So I’ll use super cool blue now, bring in a blue bodied version of the pack and okay that. Close my block manager, and just have a V-Ray warning here because it wants to overwrite some materials, and then we’ll do another V-Ray RT to check the result. So you can see now that the materials from the second version of the deodorant pack have been imported successfully and so using Blocks is a very efficient way of being able to change either a complete component or part of a component within a larger file.

The downside of using Blocks when it comes to visualisation, is that from the point of view of Rhino’s display pipeline, is that we still have to deal with lots of polygons, and the same is true when we come to render out with V-Ray, because V-Ray still needs to render out each of the individual polygons here. So from the point of view of display management and rendering then Blocks gives us the facility of a smaller file but may still give us some issues. This is where V-Ray Proxies become useful.

So I’m now going to open a component file, so if we open for example the super cool black file here, just changed to a shaded view, and we’ll look at V-Ray Proxies.

So the V-Ray Proxy object is essentially a reference that V-Ray creates and it gives us two things, a separate file that V-Ray references at render time, and a decimated mesh display that’s very lightweight that means that we could very easily manipulate huge scenes inside of Rhino without the display slowing down at all. So any Rhino geometry could become a V-Ray Proxy object, but one needs to be a little careful when you create Proxy Objects and you’ll see why in a moment.

So to create Proxy Objects I go to my V-Ray for Rhino toolbar and if I hover over the button with the tree on it, you will see that I can either import or write V-Ray Proxies. So I want to write a V-Ray Proxy here. So I’m going to select the geometry that I want to convert into a Proxy and right click on the icon and I’ll then be given the choice of a name for this file and I’ll call it deodorant pack 01 and then I’ll get a dialogue box about how to write the Proxy.

So there are three ways that we can write out the V-Ray Proxy. We can either export all the objects as one single mesh file which is perhaps the easiest way of using V-Ray Proxies, and so all my separate surfaces here with their materials, are going to be one V-Ray mesh or V-Ray Proxy, or we can choose to split out the objects as a separate meshes and either find them recursively or do this non recursively. The first option here is generally the easiest to deal with. Now this checkbox here, automatically create Proxies is the one that we need to be careful about. With this option checked, my Rhino geometry immediately gets lost and turned into a V-Ray Proxy object. So we need to make sure we are working on a copy of the file when we do this, or make sure that we don’t save the Rhino file itself. So I’m going to hit the okay button now and you’ll see that what happens is that my object now, appears as a very much decimated mesh and yet when I come to do a V-Ray RT of this, you’ll see that it renders as the complete object. In terms of how Rhino sees this, Rhino only sees this as the decimated mesh, so you’ll need to use V-Ray RT or a V-Ray production render to actually see the result of the geometry.

Now you’ll see that whilst the proxy object is kept in its original Rhino file, then the materials are maintained. Now I’m going to now open my model with just the tray in it. So now I can bring in the V-Ray Proxy in to my file and you’ll see that this comes in with the same decimated mesh display as previous and let’s have a look at this with an RT render. So immediately you’ll notice that when we bring in a Proxy mesh into Rhino, that the V-Ray materials are replaced with just a diffuse material which will have a simple ID number to it. And if we go to our material editor, you will see that we have what is called a V-Ray multi-material which is the sort of wrapper that contains all the individual elements to which individual materials are applied, and if we look underneath them for multi-material, we’ll see all the diffuse colour of the various components.

So if we are bringing in a V-Ray Proxy object in this way, directly, then we are going to lose the original Rhino materials that have been applied to it. There are various reasons for this but one of the main reasons is that V-Ray Proxy objects are cross platform objects. So Rhino can bring in a V-Ray Proxy that was created in V-Ray Formax or V-Ray Formayer, and because of that we need to have a simplified material description.

So what we need to do inside of our model here is to go to our multi-material and change the references of our individual materials. So for example, I can change 02 black plastic number four, which is the greyest material, to my clear plastic and you’ll see my V-Ray RT starting to update. So eventually we’ll be able to replace the multi-material ID’s with the correct material and arrive at a correct version of the product. Once we have this, again the V-Ray Proxy object can be arrayed just like Rhino geometry. So it can be moved, copied even scaled, although you might want to be careful about doing that. But certainly to array, copy and scale, it’s a very simple process. And big difference that you generally see is that the display is very fast now because we’ve got this almost no polygons that we’re actually moving around the screen.

So what actually happens when we render a V-Ray Proxy object is that the information is read from the actual proxy file by V-Ray, render bucket at a time. So only the information that’s actually being rendered is being loaded in to the file at any one time. So this is what in V-Ray is known as dynamic geometry. The advantage of this is not only in terms of how easy it is to manipulate the scene and how small the file is, it is that there is also very little memory overhead going on because V-Ray is only concerned with a few number of polygons each time. So material issues aside, you can see that the V-Ray Proxy is an exceedingly efficient way of being able to render a scene. So you can see that when the render has completed that all the fine detail that was in the original Rhino detail is represented in the V-Ray mesh.

So the obvious disadvantage with V-Ray Proxies is the fact, when we work inside of Rhino and bring a proxy in directly, that we lose the original material definitions, and like most things, there’s a surprisingly easy way to work around this.

So how we get round the material issues is this. If we go back to the original component file, and I pick my geometry and I create a proxy as previous. I’ll overwrite the file I created earlier to do this and I’ll make sure I use the single mesh option and automatically create proxies. Okay, so now I’ve got my proxy. Then, once I’ve created the proxy, I save this file. I’m going to save it as super cool black proxy, and the idea is now is that the material definitions are actually saved inside of the Rhino file, whereas the proxy mesh is a separate entity.

So if I go back now to my model of the tray and the render scene, so it’s the tray with the light and the floor. Now if I go to my insert dialogue, and bring in the file that I just saved as a Block Instance, and place this, and then I can do my array of this geometry. Then because I’ve brought in a Rhino file as  a Block Instance, then the materials are going to be referenced from that Rhino file. So this is a very effective way of being able to use V-Ray Proxies inside of a Rhino Block definition in order to maintain materials.

So we’ve now got all the advantages of small file size, ability to replace components very quickly so that we can do alternatives on things like labels, body colours. We have a file that is using very little memory and render time and one which is also a small file size and has very little overhead on the display manager in Rhino.

So thank you very much for watching. We’ll be back soon with more Rhino and V-Ray tutorial videos. 

 

Video Test Page

Rhino for Mac - Learn With Our Getting Started Series

 

Rhino's modelling tools allow anything to be modelled regardless of size, shape & complexity. These tutorials were created to help you get to grips with the basics so you can start to design freely within the unrestrained world of Rhino on your Mac.

 

 

 

Are you new to Rhino for Mac? Then these are the tutorials for you, presented by Sean, one of Simply Rhino's level 1 Rhino3d trainers.

Rhino's modelling tools allow anything to be modelled regardless of size, shape & complexity. These tutorials were created to help you get to grips with the basics so you can start to design freely within the unrestrained world of Rhino on your Mac.

 

Video Tutorial 1  Absolute Coordinates, Relative Coordinates and Distance Angle Constraint

 

 

Video Tutorial 2  Polyline, Line Segments, Line, Control Point Curve & Interpolate Point Curve
Rhino For Mac Tutorial Two

 

Video Tutorial 3  Modelling Aids

 

Video Tutorial 4  Selection, Control Points & Solid Points

 

Video Tutorial 5  Creating an object: Circle; Arc; Line; Curve Boolean; Polar Array; Solid Extrude Planar Curve Straight

 

You can also sign up to our Rhino for Mac YouTube channel to get auto updates as soon as we post new tutorials and videos.

If you've enjoyed these tutorials and there's something specific you'd like us to cover in the future then contact us & let us know.

Ready for something more advanced? Then see our Rhino for Mac webinar recordings here, these are suitable for those looking to move forward with product design with Rhino on the Mac.

Return to Installing V-Ray for Rhino

 

 

Hi this is Phil from Simply Rhino and in this video we’re going to take a look at installing V-Ray for Rhino. We’re going to first take a look at doing a stand-alone installation on a local machine and then we’re going to take a look at doing a network installation. This is where we have the licence for V-Ray on a remote machine or a server, and Rhino and the V-Ray plug-in on a local machine. Finally we’re going to look at some troubleshooting techniques that we can use to diagnose problems with the V-Ray installation. 

There are two elements to the V-Ray for Rhino software, the first of which is a USB hardware key and the second of which is the downloadable software. When you purchase your V-Ray for Rhino from Simply Rhino, your USB hardware key will already be programmed with your license information. You’ll also be sent full installation details and a log-in for the Chaos Group website. To download the software, visit chaosgroup.com, log-in with the details you’ve been given and go to the download section. You should see a screen something like this that shows you the software that you have available for download. Make sure that you download the correct plug-in for the version of Rhino that you have. There are separate 32 and 64 bit plug-ins for Rhino 5 and it’s essential that you install the correct plug-in. You’ll need to download the same software, irrespective of whether you want a local installation or a network installation. Once you’ve downloaded the software, the software should appear in your downloads and you can then move this installer to another location. 

Before you install V-Ray for Rhino, it’s first of all worth opening Rhino and making sure that you have the latest version. You can do this by going to help and check for updates, and Rhino will tell you whether or not it’s up to date. Close down Rhino, and as with all software, it’s a good idea to make sure you pause your virus protection whilst you’re installing. Then it’s just a simple case of double clicking on the installer and letting the installer run. Here we’re installing our dealer copy of V-Ray for Rhino. You would either have a commercial version which is ADV software, or you’d have an educational software which has the suffix EDU and it’s important that you install the right version of the software for the license. So accept the agreement and then for a stand-alone installation, we install all the components. Make sure that the route Rhinoceros directory is the right one. So in this case we’re installing a 64 bit plug-in and we want to install it to the Rhino 5, 64 bit folder. Then we can start with the installation.

We’ll be prompted midway through the installation to install a Webu key setup. This is the software for the USB hardware lock and we’ll run this in English language. Install the default components and you can skip the readme if you want to. The V-Ray installation will then finish and create an uninstaller and then  it’s important that we keep this option which is ticked by default, which is register V-Ray license server as service. 

Okay so once we’ve finished the installation, we can then plug the USB license key in to a USB port on your machine and restart your computer. So having put the USB key in, we’ve restarted the machine and I’m now going to open up Rhino and you can see now that Rhino is loading the V-Ray plug-in and while it’s doing this, the start up time for Rhino will increase slightly. Okay so Rhino is now open, the first thing we need to do is go to render and go to current render and go to V-Ray for rhino. You’ll see when we do this that we get a couple of new toolbars. These toolbars can be dragged out and then docked with our main tabs if we wish. So we have a V-Ray for Rhino toolbar which has a materials, options, frame buffer, production renderer, real-time renderer and then some ground playing lighting and V-Ray Proxy buttons. Then we have the V-Ray Extra toolbar which has the batch renderer and a  couple of other buttons to choose depth of field and perspective correction. 

So now just going to check that V-Ray is working just by drawing a little bit of geometry and pressing the render button and you can see here that the V-Ray frame buffer opens and we’re all good to go. 

So if the installation procedure was followed correctly and the USB key was installed at the time of restart, then your V-Ray for Rhino plug-in should be functioning correctly. If you start your machine without the USB key in and you try to perform a render, you will see this error code here, could not obtain a license. If you see this code and you know that you haven’t got your USB key plugged in then simply plug the USB key in, go to your start menu, go to all applications, Chaos Group and then run launch V-Ray licence server and you’ll now be able to render successfully. So when you restart the machine with the USB hardware lock in place, the license server automatically starts at start up, whereas if you start the machine without the USB key in on putting the USB key in, you need to manually start the license server as we just did. If you are still seeing the could not obtain a license error, then the first thing we need to check is that your computer is communicating correctly with the USB license key. We can do this with a simple web browser check. 

Open up a web browser and type in this address. When we do this, we should see a page similar to this that lists the licenses that we have on the USB hardware log. If you can’t get access to this page, then it is possible that you have some anti-virus software, or port blocking software that is blocking access to the port in question, and this is the port, 30304 that your machine needs to have open to allow access to the USB license key, and you may find that some commercial anti-virus programmes, or firewall programmes, will block access to this port. If you can see this page, but you’re still seeing license issues, then there are two other quick things that you can check. 

First of all, go to the task manager and make sure that your V-Ray license service is running. Click on the services tab and look for VRL service. This should be running. If the service is running then we need to check that the license server is actually looking in the right place for the V-Ray license. Go to your start menu, go to all applications, Chaos Group and open up change V-Ray client license settings. Here we want to make sure that the license server says local host and the connection port is 30304 and on a local installation, this is what the license server and port should be set to. 

Now let’s take a look at how we install V-Ray for a network installation. This is where we want to house the license remotely from our local machine. So in this case, the local machine is here, SR Workstation, and I have another machine called Workstation here, which for the purpose of this exercise I’m going to treat as a server. So I’m going to install just the license components on the workstation and have my installation of V-Ray and Rhino on the local machine. 

So I’m now on the machine that we’re using as a server and I’m going to install the V-Ray for Rhino software. I’m going to accept the agreement and this time I’m just going to install the tools necessary for dongle licensing. So I’m going to install the Webu key, licensing software and the utilities for dongle licensing. I’m not going to install V-Ray for Rhino or any of the other tools, and let the installation run, and again go through the Webu key setup, and skip the readme, and wait for V-Ray to create the uninstaller, register the license server as a server and finish. 

At this stage we should now insert the USB hardware lock in to the server and restart the machine. We can verify that the license service is running by going to our start menu, all apps, Chaos Group and launch V-Ray license server. If we see an error like this saying cannot start V-Ray license server due to another instance running, then we know that we already have an instance of the license server running, so we’re good to go. 

So at this stage there is nothing different about the installation service other than the fact that we have chosen to not install some of the components. So the license management software and the USB key driver are installed as a local installation on our server. 

Okay so now I’m back on my local machine which is this machine here and my USB key and licensing key is installed on the workstation which is our server. So on a local machine, a good way of installing software for a network installation is to install all of the license components as we did at the start of this video, in other words, in exactly the same manner as if you were doing a local installation. Then all we need to do is change where V-Ray looks for the license. So we can do this by going to the start menu, all apps, Chaos Group and change V-Ray client license settings. So if we’ve done a default installation, we’ll have local host as the license server. All we need to do now is instead of local host, type in the name of our server, which in this case is Workstation and hit okay. Then I can start up Rhino, create a piece of test geometry and render, and you’ll see that V-Ray sees the license across the network and renders away quite happily. 

If you want to check that your local machine can see the license on the network, then you can again use the web browser check and type in an address similar to this to check access to the license. So again we’ll open up a browser, type in my server address and we’ll see exactly the same information that we saw before from our license key, except this time it’s placed on a different machine. If you’re unable to see the remote license information via a web browser, then it’s very unlikely that your V-Ray installation is going to work. In this case, check that the installation is correct on both the remote and the local machines, check that the server name is specified correctly and has the correct path so that your remote machine can see the server, and also check that there’s no port blocking or anti-virus software that is preventing access to the relevant port which is 30304 on your server. 

I hope this video has been useful and please check back regularly for V-Ray for Rhino and Rhino training videos on our video channels. 

Installing V-Ray for Rhino - Video Tutorials

There are two video tutorials on this page, please select the right video for the version of V-Ray you are looking to install, either V-Ray 2.0 for Rhino or V-Ray 3.0 for Rhino.


Installing V-Ray 3.0 for Rhino
 

In this video tutorial we take a look at the complete upgrade process from V-Ray 2.0 to V-Ray 3.0.
The video is also suitable for those looking to install a V-Ray 3.0 full product as in our video V-Ray 2.0 is uninstalled.

The video includes

  • Updating the USB license key
  • Uninstalling older versions of V-Ray
  • Removing redundant Rhino Toolbars
  • Downloading and Installing V-Ray 3.0
  • Quick look at the new License Manager and V-Ray Asset Editor

The video shows the upgrade process based on a standalone (local) USB license key (dongle) installation.
 

Read the V-Ray 3.0 for Rhino Installation Video Transcript
 


Installing V-Ray 2.0 for Rhino
 

This video is a great reference for anyone new to V-Ray and we recommend you watch it before beginning your V-Ray license installation.

There are two options when installing your V-Ray for Rhino license(s):

  1. Standalone
  2. Network / Floating

Either solution requires the USB Hardware Lock (also referred to as the Wibukey)

First we'll look at completing a standalone and then a network installation. A Network Installation is where we have the license for V-Ray on a remote machine or server with V-Ray accessible by multiple Windows PC’s.

We'll end our installation tutorial with some troubleshooting, looking at common issues that can arise with a V-Ray installation.

If after watching this video you are still having issues getting V-Ray to work then please contact us, we’re always happy to help.

Your presenter is Simply Rhino's Senior Trainer, Phil Cook. Phil is an expert in Rhino3d and V-Ray for Rhino
 

Read the V-Ray 2.0 for Rhino Installation Video Transcript


V-Ray 3 for Rhino Logo

 

These Rhino3d for Windows Free Video Tutorials have been curated by the team at Simply Rhino to help you learn Rhino.

We hope they help to expand your knowledge of, and ways of working with, Rhino/Rhinoceros and some of its plugins. 
 

Your presenter for this series is Simply Rhino's Senior Trainer, Phil Cook. Phil is an expert in Rhino3d and V-Ray for Rhino

 

Rhino3d Video Tutorial List

  1. Rhino Block Instances & V-Ray Proxies
  2. Creating and Controlling a Transitional Surface in Rhino3d
  3. V-Ray for Rhino - Textures and Decals
  4. Engine Cover - Modelling the Overall Form and Complex Corner Blend (First in a series of three)
  5. Engine Cover - Adding Detail (Second in a series of three)
  6. Engine Cover - Exporting to SOLIDWORKS (Third in a series of three)
  7. Modelling in Rhino - The Coffee Pot - Generating Production Surfaces and Solids from 2D Design Intent - (Part One of Three)
  8. Modelling in Rhino - The Coffee Pot - Generating Production Surfaces and Solids from 2D Design Intent - (Part Two of Three)
  9. Modelling in Rhino - The Coffee Pot - Generating Production Surfaces and Solids from 2D Design Intent - (Part Three of Three)

 

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Video Tutorial 1 - Rhino Block Instances & V-Ray Proxies
 

This first tutorial examines working with multiple instances of objects in the same Rhino file and introduces strategies to help with minimising file size and reducing memory overhead whilst at the same time increasing modelling and visualisation flexibility. The use of Rhino Block Instances and V-Ray Proxy Objects is described in detail along with a methodology to combine Blocks and Proxies together to overcome issues that arise when using them individually.

Read the Rhino Block Instances and V-Ray Proxies Video Transcript Here

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Video Tutorial 2 - Creating and Controlling a Transitional Surface in Rhino3d
 

In this second tutorial Phil looks at creating and controlling a typical transitional surface. Using the simple example of a vehicle wheel arch, Phil introduces how continuity is expressed and evaluated in Rhino before looking at a number of solutions to producing a controlled smooth transitional surface.

Read the Creating and Controlling a Transitional Surface in Rhino3d Video Transcript Here

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Video Tutorial 3 - V-Ray for Rhino, Textures and Decals

 

In this video, Phil outlines the process of creating simple textures in V-Ray for Rhino before concentrating on mapping these textures in Rhino. The standard mapping types are explained and demonstrated along with UV Unwrapping and Editing and Custom Mapping. Next Phil explains how to create decals in V-Ray for Rhino – a process which involves multiple diffuse layers and mapping channels.

Read the V-Ray for Rhino, Textures and Decals Video Transcript Here

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Video Tutorial 4 - Engine Cover - Modelling the Overall Form and Complex Corner Blend (1 of 3)

 

Phil has created a series of videos examining the creation of a styling model for an engine cover that will ultimately be exported into SolidWorks. 

In this first video in the series of three, we take a quick look at setting out the main construction curves and basic slab surfaces before moving on to look at a less than straightforward corner blend in detail. The corner blend or ball corner is often an area that causes problems for designers and modellers and we look at using some simple tried and tested strategies to overcome this.

Read the Rhino3d - Engine Cover - Modelling the Overall Form and Complex Corner Blend Video Transcript Here

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Video Tutorial 5 - Engine Cover - Adding Detail (2 of 3)

 

In this video, the second in the series of three, Phil examines adding local detail to the engine cover model created previously. In modelling the air duct detail there are two main considerations. First, it’s important to create a seamless transition between the main surface and the lead in to the duct and second it’s important to control the edge blends so that they transition between a relatively straightforward corner blend to run out completely into the main engine cover surface. These are both common situations in 3D surface modelling even though the specific context might be different. With the duct detail completed, Phil looks at creating the centre blend to join the two symmetrical engine cover halves before checking that the geometry is optimised for exporting.
 

Read the Rhino3d - Engine Cover - Adding Detail Video Transcript Here

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Video Tutorial 6 - Engine Cover - Exporting to SOLIDWORKS (3 of 3)

 

This third and final video in this special trilogy examines interoperability between Rhino and SOLIDWORKS. By making careful use of file referencing it’s possible to have styling data that can be updated in Rhino that drives parametric features inside SOLIDWORKS, thus saving time consuming re-modelling in both programs. If you use Rhino and SOLIDWORKS or you are a Rhino user and have co-workers or customers who use SOLIDWORKS then this video is for you.
 

Read the Rhino3d - Engine Cover - Exporting to SOLIDWORKS Video Transcript Here

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Video Tutorial 7 - Modelling in Rhino - The Coffee Pot - Generating Production Surfaces and Solids from 2D Design Intent - (Part One of Three)

 

This video series looks at creating production quality surfaces and solids from 2D design intent and focuses on a ceramic coffee pot. In many design disciplines, including the ceramics industry, it’s often the case that much 2D design work is done before being progressed to 3D and this tutorial follows that methodology. The starting point is an existing 2D CAD drawing presented in Adobe Illustrator. In this first video in the series of three we specifically look at the following:

  • Import 2D Illustrator data into Rhino
  • Differences between Illustrator cubic Bezier curves and Rhino NURBS curves
  • Re-create main construction curves in Rhino
  • Build high quality surfaces from minimal curve input
  • Main Body Surface and Handle Creation

If you'd like to follow the tutorial with the Illustrator file used in the video then you can download the .ai file by clicking on the image below:
 

Coffee Pot Tutorial .ai file 

 

Read the Modelling in Rhino - The Coffee Pot - Generating Production Surfaces and Solids from 2D Design Intent (Part One of Three) Video Transcript Here

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Video Tutorial 8 - Modelling in Rhino - The Coffee Pot - Generating Production Surfaces and Solids from 2D Design Intent - (Part Two of Three)

 

The second video in our series in which we show how you can create production quality surfaces and solids in Rhino from 2D design intent. In this video Phil looks specifically at Creating the Spout ‘A’ Surface, Creating the Lid ‘A’ Surface and how to Create the ‘B’ surfaces manually to allow for varying wall thickness of our coffee pot. If you want to follow the series with the same Illustrator file then you can download it from the link supplied above with the first video in the series.

 

Read the Modelling in Rhino - The Coffee Pot - Generating Production Surfaces and Solids from 2D Design Intent (Part Two of Three) Video Transcript Here

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Video Tutorial 9 - Modelling in Rhino - The Coffee Pot - Generating Production Surfaces and Solids from 2D Design Intent - (Part Three of Three)

 

The final video in our series in which we show how you can create production quality surfaces and solids in Rhino from 2D design intent. In this video Phil shows how to make the model watertight and then progresses to a quick render using V-Ray Express. If you want to follow the series with the same Illustrator file then you can download it from the link supplied with the first video in the series.

 

Read the Modelling in Rhino - The Coffee Pot - Generating Production Surfaces and Solids from 2D Design Intent (Part Three of Three) Video Transcript Here

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We'll be adding new tutorials over the coming months, keep checking this page to see the latest and if you've enjoyed these tutorials and there's something specific you'd like us to cover in the future then contact us & let us know.

You can also sign up to our Webinars & Tutorials YouTube Channel to get auto updates as soon as we post new videos.

 

Rhino for Mac

Rhino for Mac - Learn With Our Getting Started Series

 

Are you new to Rhino for Mac? Then these are the tutorials for you, presented by Sean, one of Simply Rhino's level 1 Rhino3d trainers.

Rhino's modelling tools allow anything to be modelled regardless of size, shape & complexity. These free tutorials were created to help you get to grips with the basics so you can start to design freely within the unrestrained world of Rhino on your Mac.

 

_______________________________________________________________________________
 

Rhino for Mac Video Tutorial 1 - Absolute Coordinates, Relative Coordinates and Distance Angle Constraint
 

Read the Getting Started with Rhino for Mac - Video 1 - Transcript Here
 

_______________________________________________________________________________
 

Rhino for Mac Video Tutorial 2 - Polyline, Line Segments, Line, Control Point Curve & Interpolate Point Curve
 

Read the Getting Started with Rhino for Mac - Video 2 - Transcript Here
 

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Rhino for Mac Video Tutorial 3 - Modelling Aids 
 

Read the Getting Started with Rhino for Mac - Video 3 - Transcript Here
 

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Rhino for Mac Video Tutorial 4 - Selection, Control Points & Solid Points
 

Read the Getting Started with Rhino for Mac - Video 4 - Transcript Here
 

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Rhino for Mac Video Tutorial 5 - Creating an object: Circle; Arc; Line; Curve Boolean; Polar Array; Solid Extrude Planar Curve Straight
 

Read the Getting Started with Rhino for Mac - Video 5 - Transcript Here

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Rhino for Mac Video Tutorial 6 - Exploring Rhino's Boolean Commands - Part 1
 

Read the Getting Started with Rhino for Mac - Video 6 - Transcript Here

_______________________________________________________________________________
 

Rhino for Mac Video Tutorial 7 - Exploring Rhino's Boolean Commands - Part 2
 

Read the Getting Started with Rhino for Mac - Video 7 - Transcript Here 

_______________________________________________________________________________
 

You can also sign up to our Rhino for Mac YouTube channel to get auto updates as soon as we post new tutorials and videos.

If you've enjoyed these tutorials and there's something specific you'd like us to cover in the future then contact us & let us know.

Ready for something more advanced? Then see our Rhino for Mac webinar recordings here, these are suitable for those looking to move forward with product design with Rhino on the Mac.

Video Tutorials

Simply Rhino Video Tutorials 

See individual flyouts for current tutorials.

Let us know what you'd like to see covered in a future video tutorial? We'll try and make it happen it for you.

 

Simply Rhino 3XS Rhino Workstations 

Provisional Details

As the UK ’s premier Rhinoceros Specialist, we are often asked about hardware specifications and system configurations. We have collated some general hardware and operating advice but we have also been working closely with leading hardware manufacturers to create a new range of workstations designed specifically for Rhino. 

Simply Rhino is now proud to announce this new range of professional Rhino workstations designed in collaboration with Scan Computers and featuring hardware from PNY including NVIDIA Quadro graphics cards.

Scan 3XS systems are professionally built in the state of the art 3XS lab with each system undergoing an eight stage build process including a 24hour burn test and an 88 point QC check.

The range as described here extends from an affordable entry level professional machine to an extremely high end solution. All of the workstations can be individually configured on the 3XS website. 

These workstations are protected with a 3 Year warranty, the first year of which is on-site. 

 

3XS R1

3XS R1 

A solid entry level machine for the serious Rhino user, featuring workstation class PNY NVIDIA Quadro graphics and offering high performance and great value for money.

  • Intel Core i5 7400 3.0-3.5GHz Turbo
  • Quad Core (4 Thread) 6MB Cache 
  • 8GB RAM (32GB max)
  • PNY NVIDIA Quadro K620 
  • 384 CUDA cores 
  • 250GB SSD SATA III 2.5"
  • 1TB HDD 7200rpm
  • 24x DVD Reader & Writer
  • Windows 10 Professional 64bit
  • 3 Year Warranty - Mainland UK (1st year on-site, 2nd & 3rd year return to base)

Price : £895 + VAT

 

3XS R2

An affordable mid level workstation featuring a fast Intel i7 processor with Hyperthreading and the PNY NVIDIA Quadro M2000 4GB graphics card.

  • Intel Core i7-7700K 4.2-4.5GHz 
  • Quad Core (8 thread) 8MB Cache 
  • 16GB DDR4 RAM 
  • PNY NVIDIA Quadro M2000 4GB
  • 768 CUDA cores 
  • 250GB SSD SATA III 2.5"
  • 2TB 7200rpm HD
  • 24x DVD Reader & Writer
  • Windows 10 Professional 64bit
  • 3 Year Warranty - Mainland UK (1st year on-site, 2nd & 3rd year return to base)

Price : £1375 + VAT

Configure your 3XS R2

 

3XS R3

3XS R3 

A fully specified workstation for the demanding Rhino professional featuring 12 processing cores and 8GB PNY NVIDIA Quadro M4000 graphics.

  • Intel Core i7-6800K Extreme 3.4-3.8GHz Turbo 
  • Six Core (12 thread) 15MB Cache
  • 32GB DDR4 RAM (64GB max)
  • PNY NVIDIA Quadro M4000 8GB
  • 1664 CUDA cores 
  • 250GB SSD SATA III 2.5"
  • 2TB 7200rpm HD
  • 24x DVD Reader & Writer
  • Windows 10 Professional 64bit
  • 3 Year Warranty - Mainland UK (1st year on-site, 2nd & 3rd year return to base)

Price : £1845 + VAT

Configure your 3XS R3

 

3XS R4

3XS R4

A high end workstation featuring intel Xeon technology with 32 processor threads - ideal for demanding CPU based rendering. Also included is a 8GB PNY NVIDIA Quadro M5000 graphics card and 64GB RAM.

  • Dual Intel Xeon E5-2640v4 2.0GHz
  • 2 x 10 Cores (40 threads) 25MB Cache
  • 64GB DDR4 RAM (64GB max)
  • PNY NVIDIA Quadro K5000 8GB
  • 2048 CUDA cores 
  • 500GB SSD SATA III 2.5"
  • 2TB 7200rpm HDD
  • 24x DVD Reader & Writer
  • Windows 10 Professional 64bit
  • 3 Year Warranty - Mainland UK (1st year on-site, 2nd & 3rd year return to base)

Price : £4935 + VAT 

Configure your 3XS R4

 

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