Rhino for Mac - Learn & Get Started Tutorial 1 - Video Transcript

Rhino3d for Mac Tutorial Series - Curated by Simply Rhino to help you get started and learn Rhino on the Mac platform.

This is the video transcript, published alongside the video, to further support your Rhino learning experience.

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Rhino for Mac Video Tutorial 1 - Screenshot

 

Welcome to the Simply Rhino, Rhino for Mac Tutorial Series. I’m Sean from Simply Rhino and this is a tutorial in which we’ll be covering absolute coordinates, relative coordinates and distance angle constraints.

I’m going to start by just expanding the top view, so I’ll just double click on the word top. I’m going to start by just defining a five by five box by using a polyline. So I’m going to come over to the left here and click on the tool, polyline. Now in bold, Rhino is asking me for start of polyline. My cursor has changed from an arrow to crosshairs, which means that Rhino requires a left click on the screen or a value to be typed into this box here. If I type in 0 and press enter, Rhino will recognise that as a shortcut to the origin. We don’t need to type in 0, 0, 0. Now in order to find the other point on this box, I’m going to type in another absolute coordinate. Now I just need to work out what that co-ordinate is and I need to make sure that I type it into this box here and I separate it with a comma. Now if I’m defining a five by five box and drawing it in an anticlockwise direction, 5, 5 will be the next coordinate. The next coordinate is up in the corner here and I’m going to define that by typing in 5, 5. So that’s x, y, always separated with a comma. Now to define this point here, again I need to just calculate what that co-ordinate would be, and that would be 0 in the x and 5 in the y. Now in order to close this object, I can click on the word close, I can run my cursor over that particular point revealing the object snap point or I could type in C, enter.

Now let’s have a look at relative co-ordinates now. It’s an easier way of defining points because Rhino will be aware of the last point that I chose. So again I’m going to click on polyline here, start a polyline in bold. Now I need to define this with an absolute co-ordinate, the very first point because relative co-ordinates of course have to be relative to something. So if I type in 8, 0, the line will appear. Now if I want to draw a triangle and I’m going to define the hypotenuse now, I’m going to type in the word R first of all, that’s short for relative. Now I just need to work out where this point is relative to the last point that I defined. If I type in 5, 5. There, it will be 5 in the x and 5 in the y. Now if I wanted to create a right angled triangle here using relative coordinates, type in R. Now I need to define whether or not I’m travelling in a positive or minus direction. In this case I’m travelling minus. So I type in -5, 0, press enter. Now again in order to close this, I can place my cursor over this point and make a left click.

Now let’s have a look at distance and angle constraints. This is a different way of defining points. We define the points by breaking them down into two separate inputs. Let’s run the polyline command again and I’m just going to choose a point somewhere on the construction plane. Now if I type in 5 rather than press enter, Rhino will recognise that as a distance of 5 and what I need to confirm now is the orientation. So I can confirm that with a left click on the construction plane. Let’s just do that again with different dimensions. Type in 4, press enter. Now in order to get this line horizontal, I can hold down the shift key and that will activate orthogonal. So you can see as I move my cursor, I’m moving in increments of 90 degrees. So I hold down the shift key and left click.

Now if I wanted to create an angle other than my orthogonal setting, what I would do was that I would select the angle symbol, which is above the comma on the keyboard, and I type in for example 20, I press enter. There, now I’ve got increments of 20 degrees. If I type in the distance now, say three, I’m now moving it increments of 20 degrees and a distance of three exactly. Notice then in that example, I actually chose the angle constraint before the distance, but we could of course do it both ways. If I type in two, enter. There’s my distance of two. Now if I type in angle symbol for example, followed by 10, I press enter. There I have increments of 10. I choose the first increment which will be 10. I press enter to close the command.

Thanks for joining us for that tutorial. I hope that was helpful. Please subscribe to our Simply Rhino, Rhino for Mac Tutorials to receive notifications of our new tutorials as they are added. Thank you.

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  • Last modified on Monday, 06 June 2016 14:54
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